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Last week we discussed the differences in acoustic and electric drums and what those differences mean when you're looking for the right instrument for you. This week we'll talk a little about guitars. While fundamentally the same, acoustic and electric guitars differ in a few major ways. Of course, the first difference is how they amplify the strings when plucked. Acoustic guitars use a sound box (the body) with a portal beneath the strings to reverberate and "push" the sound. Because of this, the maximum volume of an acoustic guitar can be considered quiet when compared to that of an amplified electric. Many musicians that play "heavier" music such as metal or rock . . . (well any genre outside of electronic music) have utilized the acoustic guitar for this dynamic property (a prime example would be Metallica's "Nothing Else Matters" or CCR's "Who'll Stop The Rain". Acoustic guitars can vary in price but always remember, you always get what you pay for with musical instruments! Go in to your local music store and try out a few to see what body styles and neck styles suit your needs! Which brings us to the electric guitar. With the same 6 strings that we find on the acoustic but the amplification of said strings is where the two really differ. Without going into too much description, the way an electric guitar works is through the magnetic pickups that "transfer" the vibrations into a signal that is then amplified by the, well, amplifier! Electric guitars usually have more "shallow" or thinner necks in general than their acoustic counterparts. This, coupled with "lighter" or thinner gauge strings lends for quick mobility on the fretboard, which some may believe makes electric guitar a bit easier to play. Because electric guitars need amplification to be heard, they are not ideal for travel, but in the right atmosphere (perhaps a rock show?) they are just what the doctor ordered. My doctor recommends high doses of distortion.

Once again I would like to reiterate that both have their advantages and disadvantages depending on what type of music and tone you're looking to produce. Always do your research on brands and styles before buying! You will easily solve the debate for yourself: Acoustic versus Electric, it is up to you!

If you or someone you know is interested in learning to play an instrument, I recommend you check out the rest of our website. We have two convenient locations in Frisco and Allen, Texas too, so please stop by and take a tour! We offer private music lessons for piano, guitar, drums, bass, voice, and songwriting! Matt Burk Music Studio: Learn, Create, Perform!

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